Illness, Aging, Pregnancy: Readings and Reflections on the...

Illness, Aging, Pregnancy: Readings and Reflections on the...

Illness, Aging, Pregnancy: Readings and Reflections on the Therapist’s Interruptions to Therapy

Presented By: Fred Rozendal, PhD | Four Fridays, January 27, February 17, March 24, and April 28, 2017 | 10 am – 12 noon

Location: CIP, 1330 Lincoln Avenue, Suite 201, San Rafael, CA 94901

Cost: $140 early registration fee up to 10 days prior to seminar, $160 after. 

CIP Member Discounts: $100 early registration, $110 after 

CEs: 8 CEs for LMFTs & LCSWs and 8 CEs for Psychologists (Certificates issued after completion of the four sessions)

Fred Rozendal Bio:

Fred Rozendal, PhD, has taught a graduate Psychodynamics course for the last decade, after completing post-graduate training in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy at the San Francisco Institute for Psychoanalytic Studies.  In private practice in San Francisco and San Rafael, he is interested in understanding and deepening work with difficult clients, and in teaching aspects of this work.  

Course Description:

The fantasy of an unchanging self is challenged when the therapist  ages, becomes ill, or becomes less available for work through pregnancy and possible miscarriage. This program will examine the impact on the therapist as well as the client. 

We will use readings assigned in advance for class meetings that were prepared by psychoanalysts as prompts for discussion. Our unconscious fantasies of immortality (in the case of illness and aging) or idealization (in the case of pregnancy) lead to therapists typically avoiding awareness of the impact of interruptions to therapy.

Readings will include subjective experience by therapists and their discovery of personal and professional issues in the process.

This course provides an introduction to selected articles and an opportunity to reflect upon and discuss matters that often are denied 

by therapists. It will cultivate greater preparedness for interruptions and awareness of resources that are available to turn to when needed.

Source Material: 

This program is derived from the following works: 

Chessick, R.D. (2013). Special Problems for the Elderly Psychoanalyst in the Psychoanalytic Process. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 61:67-93.

Cullington-Roberts, D. (2004). The Psychotherapist's Miscarriage and Pregnancy as an Obstacle to Containment. Psychoanal. Psychother., 18:99-110.

Denton, T. (2012). The Analyst's Pregnancy: A Paradise Lost. Mod. Psychoanal., 37:82-115.

Deutsch, R.A. (2011). A Voice Lost, A Voice Found: After the Death of the Analyst. Psychoanal. Inq., 31:526-535.

Erikson, E. and J. (1998).  The life cycle completed: Extended version. Norton.

Junkers, G.  (2013). The Empty Couch: The taboo of ageing and retirement in psychoanalysis. London: Routledge. 

Power, Anne.  (2015) Forced endings in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis: Attachment and loss in retirement.   London: Routledge.

Schwartz, H. and Silver, A-L. (1990).  Illness in the analyst: Implications for the treatment relationship.  International Universities Press

Torrigiani, M.G., Marzi, A. (2005). When the analyst is physically ill: Vicissitudes in the analytical relationship. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 86:1373-1389. Pp. 82-90.

Additional resources:

Denis, P..  (2013). Psychoanalyst: A profession for an immortal?  In Junkers, G The Empty Couch: The taboo of ageing and retirement in psychoanalysis.  London: Routledge. Pp. 32-40

Frommer, M.S. (2005). Living in the Liminal Spaces of Mortality. Psychoanal. Dial., 15:479-498.

Frommer, M.S. (2013). When the Analyst's Protected Space is Breached: Commentary on Paper by Stephanie R. Brody. Psychoanal. Dial., 23:59-71

Junkers, G.  (2013). The ageing psychoanalyst: Thoughts on preparing for a life without the couch.  In The Empty Couch: The taboo of ageing and retirement in psychoanalysis.  London: Routledge. Pp. 3-6 London: Routledge. Pp. 17-31.

Lasky, R.. (1990).  In Schwartz, H. and Silver, A-L. Keeping the analysis intact when the analyst has suffered a catastrophic illness: Clinical considerations Illness in the analyst: Implications for the treatment relationship.  International Universities Press, pp. 177-197.

Morrison, A.. (1990).  Doing psychotherapy while living with a life-threatening illness. In Schwartz, H. and Silver, A-L Illness in the analyst: Implications for the treatment relationship.  International Universities Press, pp. 227-250.

Quinodoz, D. (2013). Does an elderly psycho-analyst have a role to fill? In Junkers, G. The The Empty Couch: The taboo of ageing and retirement in psychoanalysis. London: Routledge. Pp. 7-16.

Rytöhonka, A. (2015). The psychoanalyst’s mind and the realities of life: to remain a psychoanalyst during times of personal crises. Scand. Psychoanal. Rev., 38:23-30.

Silver, A-L. (1990).  Resuming the work with a life-threatening illness—and further reflections.  In Schwartz, H. and Silver, A-L. Illness in the analyst: Implications for the treatment relationship.  International Universities Press, pp. 151-176.

Traesdal, T. (2013) Analysis lost and regained.  In Junkers, G.  The Empty Couch: The taboo of ageing and retirement in psychoanalysisLondon: Routledge. 

Learning Objectives:  

Upon completion of this workshop participants should be able to:

  1. Show how to reduce the therapist’s denial re interrupting/terminating therapy by describing how Arlow denied the seriousness of his illness 
  2. Identify issues likely to emerge with late aging that Erikson reports, and reasons for the struggles.
  3. Compare two alternative approaches to handling an interruption with clients, and providing information to clients about the therapist’s illness, and identify an approach that makes sense to you.
  4. Describe several issues that confront an ill therapist in determining whether and how to make decisions about continuing one’s practice; identify reduction of emotionally, cognitively and physically reduced function in the therapist, and ways to address them.
  5. List responses and struggles that therapists and clients (separately) may have to the therapist’s pregnancy and/or miscarriage: what are issues to be prepared to deal with clinically?
  6. Plan for the therapist’s early ending of professional work by identifying several issues that can require retirement.
  7. Assess the impact on clients of our unanticipated ending of therapy (e.g., through unexpected death) 

Course Schedule/Outline:  

Class 1: The Shock of Mortality: Illness and Aging

10:00 am – 10: 20 am Introduction to course and each other

10:20 am – 11:00 am Show how to reduce the therapist’s denial interrupting/terminating therapy.

11:00am – 12:00 pm Identify issues likely to emerge with aging per Erikson.

Class 2: Illness in the Therapist

10:00 am – 10:20 am Introduction to literature: conflicting approaches historically

10: 20 am – 11:00 am Compare/contrast two alternative approaches to handling an interruption with clients and describe underlying reasons.

11:00 am – 12:00 pm Describe several issues that confront an ill therapist and show how to manage this one’s practice.

Class 3: A Therapist’s Pregnancy and/or Miscarriage

10:00 am – 10:10 am Introduction 

10:10 am – 11:00 am Describe the impact of pregnancy related issues as they arise for therapist and how this can be clinically managed.

11:00 am – 12:00 pm Describe the impact of pregnancy related issues as they arise for client and how this can be clinically managed.

Class 4: Aging of the Therapist and Death

10:00 am - 11:00 amDescribe the therapist’s retirement by identifying several issues that may require retirement.

11:00 am – 11:30 amHow to assess patients’ experiences of the loss of a therapist/analyst

11:30 am - 12:00 pmReview of processes therapists and clients face when therapy is interrupted, and conclusions for currently practicing therapists.


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